Tag Archives: Everett Klippert

An ode to one particular mother

{We want to give a shout out to the tremendous queer culture coming to Calgary this month: the Unison LGBTQ2 Choir Festival, May 18-21; and Fairy Tales “Twenty,” May 25 – June 2!}

When we started the Calgary Gay History Project in 2012, we had no idea the journey it would take us on. Currently, we are working with filmmaker Laura O’Grady from Spotlight Productions on a short film about the life of Everett Klippert. This week, we travelled with cinematographer Patrick McLaughlin, to Everett’s niece Katherine’s farm, three hours from Calgary. Everett requested to be buried here next to his beloved sister Leah (also Katherine’s mom): stalwart defender of Everett in his protracted tangle with the Canadian state.

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Everett Klippert’s headstone. He is buried next to his sister Leah and brother-in-law David.

It was Leah, a legal secretary in Calgary, who fought Everett’s unjust incarceration and categorization as a dangerous sexual offender.

It was Leah, who gathered the resources and expertise to challenge court decisions, pushing Klippert’s case forward to the Supreme Court.

It was Leah, who travelled to the Northwest Territories to support him at trial, and who visited him regularly in the Prince Albert Penitentiary.

It was Leah, 20 years older than Everett, who acted as a mother to Everett when they lost their mother to kidney disease in 1933. Everett was then six years old.

So on this Mother’s Day Weekend, we would propose a toast to Leah, mother to many, and mother to a better world for Canada’s LGBTQ2 community.

Klippert Family Photos 1940s

Klippert family photo: Front row: Merton Klippert (Everett’s father), Everett and Leah. Back row: Everett’s seven older brothers!

{KA}

Everett Klippert’s Personal Papers

The family of Everett Klippert have shared a box of his remaining personal papers with the Calgary Gay History Project. We are ever so thankful and are in the process of digitizing them for posterity. Klippert’s documents were also used by playwright Natalie Meisner in developing her play Legislating Love, which had a very successful run at Sage Theatre last month.

Here are some treasures we have captured:

Klippert Dairymen's Conference

Everett Klippert (circled) worked at Union Milk Co. Ltd. from 1943-1952.

Klippert Report Card

Note: Movies were discouraged on weekdays on this 1940s report card.

Klippert Aug 26 69

One of Everett’s notes from inside the Prince Albert Penitentiary. On August 26th, 1969 homosexuality was no longer a criminal offence in Canada (some conditions applied).

Klippert Cradle Roll

This Crescent Heights Baptist Church document is 90 years old this September.

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Legislating Love Countdown

Just one week to go until the world premiere of Legislating Love, Natalie Meisner’s play about the life and trials of Everett Klippert, produced by Sage Theatre. We are so excited!

The plot: Everett Klippert was the last person to be tried, convicted, and jailed for homosexuality in Canada. Maxine, a young historian, discovers Everett’s case. She becomes consumed with finding out who he really was, past the headlines. This is the story of the struggle to define Klippert, beyond what history wants and needs him to be.

Check out this recent interview with cast members of Legislating Love on Global:

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The play runs from March 22-31 and tickets can be purchased online: here.

sage 2

{KA}